peoplearestupidaboutebola:

theamazingsallyhogan:

what the fuck is this

Classic Borowitz Report.

(via sp00kmaster)

neptunain:

my favorite moment of high school was having to read huck finn out loud in my english class and i quite literally got kicked out of the classroom because i kept reading “respectable african american brother” instead of the n word

Greatest Huck Finn review ever…

After reading Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, I realized that I had absolutely nothing to say about it. And yet here, as you see, I have elected to say it anyway, and at great length. 

Reading this novel now, at the age of mumble-mumble, is a bit like arriving at the circus after the tents have been packed, the bearded lady has been depilated, and the funnel cake trailers have been hitched to pick-up trucks and captained, like a formidable vending armada, toward the auburn sunset. All the fun has already been used up, and I’m left behind circumnavigating the islands of elephant dung and getting drunk on Robitussin®. Same story, different day. 

How exactly did I make it through eight total years of high school and undergraduate studies in English without having read any Mark Twain but a brief (and forgotten) excerpt from Life on the Mississippi? Isn’t this illegal by now? I mean, isn’t there a clause in the Patriot Act… an eleventh commandment… a dictate from Xenu? Isn’t Huckleberry Finn, like Romeo and Julietand To Kill a Mockingbird, now an unavoidable teenage road bump between rainbow parties and huffing spray paint? Isn’t it the role of tedious classic literature to add color and texture to the pettiness of an adolescence circumscribed by status updates, muff shaving, and shooting each other? Or am I old-fashioned? 

Let’s face it. In the greater social consciousness, there are two stars of this book: (1) the word ‘nigger’ and (2) the Sherwood Schwartz-style ending in which Tom Sawyer reappears and makes even the most casual reader wonder whether he might not be retarded. 

Huckleberry Finn, for all his white trash pedigree, is actually a pretty smart kid — the kind of dirty-faced boy you see, in his younger years, in a shopping cart at Wal-Mart, being barked at by a monstrously obese mother in wedgied sweatpants and a stalagmite of a father who sweats tobacco juice and thinks the word ‘coloreds’ is too P.C. Orbiting the cart, filled with generic cigarette cartons, tabloids, and canned meats, are a half-dozen kids, glazed with spittle and howling like Helen Keller over the water pump, but your eyes return to the small, sad boy sitting in the cart. His gaze, imploring, suggestive of a caged intellect, breaks your heart, so you turn and comparison-shop for chewing gum or breath mints. He is condemned to a very dim horizon, and there’s absolutely nothing you can do about it, so you might as well buy some Altoids and forget about it… 

That boy is the spiritual descendant of Huckleberry Finn. 

The ‘nigger’ controversy — is there still one? — is terribly inconsequential. It almost seems too obvious to point out that this is (a) firstly a ‘period novel,’ meaning it that occurs at a very specific historical moment at a specific location and (b) secondly a first-person narrative, which is therefore saddled with the language, perspective, and nascent ideologies of its narrator. Should we expect a mostly uneducated, abused adolescent son of a racist alcoholic who is living in the South before the Civil War to have a respectful, intellectually-enlightened perspective toward black people? Should the character of Huck Finn, in other words, be ahistorical, anachronistic? Certainly not, if we expect any semblance of honesty from our national literature. 

Far more troubling to many critics is the ending of Huckleberry Finn, when — by a freakishly literary coincidence — Huck Finn is mistaken for Tom Sawyer by Tom’s relatives, who happen to be holding Jim (the slave on the run) in hopes of collecting a reward from his owners. There are all sorts of contrivances in this scenario — the likes of which haven’t been seen since the golden age of Three’s Company — which ends with Tom arriving and devising a ridiculously elaborate scheme for rescuing Jim. 

All in all, the ending didn’t bother me as much as it bothered some essayists I’ve read. That is, it didn’t strike me as especially conspicuous in a novel which relies a great deal on narrative implausibility and coincidence. Sure, Tom Sawyer is something of an idiot, as we discover, but in a novel that includes faked deaths and absurd con jobs, his idiocy seems well-placed. 

In the end, I suppose the greatest thing I can say about this novel is that it left me wondering what happened to Huck Finn. Would his intellect and compassion escape from his circumstances or would he become yet another bigoted, abusive father squiring another brood of dirty, doomed children around a fluorescently-lit Wal-Mart?

(Written by David on Goodreads)

(via schmurple)

Tags: huck finn

If you put the bodily secretions of anyone with a virus into a spray bottle and spray it into someones face, they’ll probably catch the disease. That’s different than being “airborne”.  Airborne means the agent can live in tiny respiratory particles that are so light they float through the air. The chances of Ebola doing that are the same as a deer sprouting wings and flying around my backyard.

Tags: ebola

(Source: selbstmordsorte, via russalex)

shatteringtheillusion:

"As the Ebola death toll rises and as images of bodies being abandoned in the streets of Liberia are broadcast around the globe, there has been a growing outcry for the scientific community to “do something” about this deadly virus. And as luck would have it, there is an “experimental Ebola vaccine” that is ready to be tested on humans next month. If Ebola starts to spread outside of Africa, and especially if it starts spreading inside the United States, people will be absolutely clamoring to get this vaccine. But will it be safe? And there will certainly be millions of people that do not want to take this vaccine under any circumstances. If the outbreak gets bad enough, will it be made mandatory at some point? If they do make it mandatory for all Americans to take an Ebola vaccine, what will you do?"

And as luck would have it (again), all the major players involved in providing the solution to the Ebola “problem” were present at this year’s top secret Bilderberg meeting. How convenient was that?

Bullshit.

(via bootyregrit)

agentscullyismyhero:

back in my day the reblog button was on the top. we had to scroll 15 miles through the snow, uphill both ways.

image

Anything Rugrats is cool.

(Source: american-niki, via shellyrl)

Tags: rugrats

crooksandliars:

Howard Dean Slams Rick Perry As Know Nothing 'Ignoramus' On Ebola

Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean didn’t mince any words when asked about Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s continued insistence that we need a travel ban on flights from West Africa to stop Ebola from spreading to the United States on Chris Hayes’ show this Friday evening while discussing the appointment of the new “Ebola czar” Ron Klain.

Howard Dean on Ebola: “I Discount Everything Republicans Say;” Rick Perry “An Ignoramus”:

HOWARD DEAN: I think it’s fine. He’s a manager. He’s not a doctor. Look, the Republicans just slay me. They are just so ridiculous. So they had an Ebola czar. His name is Vivek Murthy. He’s President Obama’s nominee for Surgeon General which the Republicans have been stalling at the request of the National Rifle Association since February. So, the Republican’s idea of how to practice medicine is to listen to the National Rifle Association. I discount everything they say, they know nothing. They’re not interested in health; they’re interested in politics. We’ve got to manage this thing. I think Klaine is a good manager…

read more

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

1996: Ebola Scare At Hospital Proves False

(But my memory of the event was pretty darn true. I was a medical student there, at the time…see my previous post)

By MICHAEL COOPER

Published: August 26, 1996

Mistakenly fearing that two seriously ill siblings who had recently come from Africa might have been suffering from the deadly and highly contagious Ebola virus, officials shut down North Central Bronx Hospital’s emergency room for more than two hours yesterday afternoon when the children were brought there for treatment.

It turned out that the children actually had severe cases of malaria, which is usually transmitted by mosquitoes, said Fred Winters, a Health Department spokesman. One of the children with the disease, a 10-year-old boy, died at 1:30 P.M. yesterday.

The two children had come with their parents a week ago from the West African nation of Guinea. The dead boy’s 13-year-old sister remained in critical condition in the intensive care unit of Montefiore Medical Center last night.

Before malaria was diagnosed, hospital workers spent two very jittery hours unsure what, if any, threat was present in their hospital.

Mr. Winters said that when hospital workers learned the children were from Africa, they immediately suspected they could have been infected with Ebola.

No one was allowed to enter or leave the emergency room after it was closed. The siblings were kept in isolation, and patients were rerouted to other area hospitals, like Montefiore, which is around the corner.

”Whenever there is a fear of infectious disease, it is best to take the most conservative steps,” Mr. Winters said. ”They didn’t know what they were dealing with at first.”

Tracy Schneider, a hospital administrator, said that the crisis was handled smoothly, with the emergency room being reopened at 4:30 P.M. ”It’s better to err on the side of prudence,” she said.

Guinea is not known for having the Ebola virus, which killed 245 people in Zaire last year and is fatal about 70 percent of the time. Malaria is rarely fatal if it is detected early enough; less than 1 percent of those who get the disease eventually die from it if it is treated in time. But the two children, who were not identified, were already in advanced stages of the disease.

”These children had an overwhelming infection,” Dr. Todd Schiffer said at a news conference outside the hospital.

As rumors that an unknown tropical disease had been detected spread to nonmedical personnel and neighbors near the hospital yesterday, an air of unease gripped the Norwood section of the Bronx. Three mothers outside the hospital, enjoying the sunny afternoon, bundled their children into strollers and pushed them away as soon as they heard.

Lorraine Garcia was walking out of her apartment building near the hospital when she heard the news. ”A friend told me that someone had died in the hospital of a contagious disease from Africa,” she said. ”He told me not to let my little boy outside.”

Tags: ebola malaria

beingliberal:

tmtp:

soloeaux:

Speaks for itself

Take note of the:
black runner’s awareness of what he’s facing;
judge’s position;
white runner with his head down (oblivious to his opponent’s path/what he has to go through) 

Great illustration by Jud Guitteau - MORE: http://judguitteau.com/

beingliberal:

tmtp:

soloeaux:

Speaks for itself

Take note of the:

  • black runner’s awareness of what he’s facing;
  • judge’s position;
  • white runner with his head down (oblivious to his opponent’s path/what he has to go through) 

Great illustration by Jud Guitteau - MORE: http://judguitteau.com/

Ebola or Blackwater Fever

When I was a medical student in New York in the mid 90s I was working at a hospital called North Central Bronx which is now closed. We were told that we had to clear all the patients out of the ER because we were getting some patients who came in on a plane. It was two kids ages 12 and 14 who had just come from Liberia and were bleeding from multiple orifices.

At the time there was an Ebola outbreak in Liberia and the concern is that these two kids had it. People in hazmat suits started running around and we really had no idea what was going on. They brought the two kids in and admitted them to isolation. I remember one of the third year pediatrics residents actually gave the press conference because there was nobody else available to speak to the media. They sent all nonessential personnel home and that of course included the medical students so I watched the rest of this on TV.

Of course, everyone was worried about Ebola and what we didn’t know was the sleepy little hospital in the North Bronx was actually the designated Ebola Center for New York City at the time. As it turned out the two kids, who were born in Liberia but were American citizens and hadn’t been back to their home country in quite a few years, had something called Blackwater fever and not Ebola.

Blackwater Fever is an overwhelming infection with a specific type of malaria that causes the breakdown of red blood cells and problems with blood clotting. It’s called Blackwater fever because the urine is black from all the red blood cell breakdown products. I wonder what the current plan for Ebola is in New York City and for all major cities in the U.S?

Remember Polio?

Few realize how greatly polio affected people in society in the early 1950s. Everyone was affected when there was epidemic outbreak. Public places were closed, and people were cut off from contact with one another. People lived in constant fear that they would be next to catch the disease, or worse, one of their children would contract polio. The lives of polio victims and those who cared for them were changed forever by the impairments that victims of polio suffered. The thought of being paralyzed was what made polio so terrifying. Although other diseases of the era had much higher mortality rates, none had the permanent ramifications that polio did. No one could understand where this disease came from or why it could not be controlled. Polio was the first high profile disease to be fully covered by the media, and the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis had a hand in providing polio related information to the media. The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis was instrumental in helping to pay for the expensive treatment and equipment needed to rehabilitate polio victims. It also funded the research for the development of a cure for polio. These funds paved the way for the improved research techniques and methods of the era carried out by scientists such as Enders, Wellers, Salk, and Sabin to isolate and develop a vaccine against polio. It was not until the development and distribution of the vaccine against polio that people could have a secure sense of hope that they would not fall victim to this paralyzing disease. Once this vaccine proved to be an effective cure, polio was basically wiped out in our nation. Those of us lucky enough to live in a time when vaccination is readily available will never know the terror that permeated the lives of so many just a few decades ago.

http://www.plosin.com/beatbegins/projects/sokol.html

There’s something unique about the three hospitals that have so far successfully treated Ebola patients — something that’s different from Texas Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, where a patient died and one worker treating him became infected.

Emory, the University of Nebraska, and the National Institutes of Health have all received and successfully discharged Ebola patients. These three hospitals are among just four in the nation with specialized biocontamination units. These are units that have existed for years, with the sole purpose of handling patients with deadly, infectious dieases like SARS or Ebola.

While biocontamination units look similar to a standard hospital room, they usually have specialized air circulation systems to remove disease particles from the facility. And, perhaps more importantly, they’re staffed by doctors who have spent years training, preparing and thinking about how to stop dangerous infections from spreading.

And as Rachel Maddow pointed out today, we have a total of 9 beds in the country that are ready to accept Ebola patients, 4 of them are occupied.

(Source: azspot, via liberalsarecool)

mediamattersforamerica:

After waging a smear campaign aimed at taking down Obama’s nominee for Surgeon General, Fox wants to know why there isn’t a Surgeon General to deal with Ebola.
Fox host Steve Doocy:  

You would normally think that in something like this, the Surgeon General would be in charge, but right now at this point oddly, the United States of America does not have a Surgeon General. His nomination is tied up in politics.

mediamattersforamerica:

After waging a smear campaign aimed at taking down Obama’s nominee for Surgeon General, Fox wants to know why there isn’t a Surgeon General to deal with Ebola.

Fox host Steve Doocy:  

You would normally think that in something like this, the Surgeon General would be in charge, but right now at this point oddly, the United States of America does not have a Surgeon General. His nomination is tied up in politics.

(via schmurple)

humansofnewyork:

"If they raise the subway fare one more time, I’m going to explode. I’m making nine dollars an hour. I walk home three hours from work every day to save that $2.50, because that’s a half gallon of milk for me and my daughter. And every time they raise the fare, they have a ‘hearing.’ But they aren’t hearing anything. It’s a fucking joke. If you go to one of those ‘hearings,’ every single person stands up and says: ‘Don’t raise the fare.’ Then they raise it anyway. Oh man, it burns me up. ‘We need the money,’ they say, ‘America is hurting.’ That’s bullshit! If I see one more TV program bragging about multimillion dollar homes I’m gonna scream. How about a fucking TV program that shows me if there is anywhere in this city that I can fucking afford to live anymore. I’m sorry, but it’s burning me up."


Tie the city’s minimum wage to the subway fare.

humansofnewyork:

"If they raise the subway fare one more time, I’m going to explode. I’m making nine dollars an hour. I walk home three hours from work every day to save that $2.50, because that’s a half gallon of milk for me and my daughter. And every time they raise the fare, they have a ‘hearing.’ But they aren’t hearing anything. It’s a fucking joke. If you go to one of those ‘hearings,’ every single person stands up and says: ‘Don’t raise the fare.’ Then they raise it anyway. Oh man, it burns me up. ‘We need the money,’ they say, ‘America is hurting.’ That’s bullshit! If I see one more TV program bragging about multimillion dollar homes I’m gonna scream. How about a fucking TV program that shows me if there is anywhere in this city that I can fucking afford to live anymore. I’m sorry, but it’s burning me up."

Tie the city’s minimum wage to the subway fare.

(via cognitivedissonance)

50starsand13bars:

hokutens-and-assassins:

PLEASE READ AND REBLOG!!!!!
Put your car keys beside your bed at night.Tell your spouse, your children, your neighbors, your parents, your Dr’s office, the check-out girl at the market, everyone you run across. Put your car keys beside your bed at night.If you hear a noise outside your home or someone trying to get in your house, just press the panic button for your car. The alarm will be set off, and the horn will continue to sound until either you turn it off or the car battery dies.This tip came from a neighborhood watch coordinator. Next time you come home for the night and you start to put your keys away, think of this: It’s a security alarm system that you probably already have and requires no installation. Test it. It will go off from most everywhere inside your house and will keep honking until your battery runs down or until you reset it with the button on the key fob chain. It works if you park in your driveway or garage.If your car alarm goes off when someone is trying to break into your house, odds are the burglar/rapist won’t stick around. After a few seconds, all the neighbors will be looking out their windows to see who is out there and sure enough the criminal won’t want that. And remember to carry your keys while walking to your car in a parking lot. The alarm can work the same way there. This is something that should really be shared with everyone. Maybe it could save a life or a sexual abuse crime.

I don’t care what your blog theme is, this can save someone’s life and needs to be spread

50starsand13bars:

hokutens-and-assassins:

PLEASE READ AND REBLOG!!!!!


Put your car keys beside your bed at night.

Tell your spouse, your children, your neighbors, your parents, your Dr’s office, the check-out girl at the market, everyone you run across. Put your car keys beside your bed at night.

If you hear a noise outside your home or someone trying to get in your house, just press the panic button for your car. The alarm will be set off, and the horn will continue to sound until either you turn it off or the car battery dies.

This tip came from a neighborhood watch coordinator. Next time you come home for the night and you start to put your keys away, think of this: It’s a security alarm system that you probably already have and requires no installation. Test it. It will go off from most everywhere inside your house and will keep honking until your battery runs down or until you reset it with the button on the key fob chain. It works if you park in your driveway or garage.

If your car alarm goes off when someone is trying to break into your house, odds are the burglar/rapist won’t stick around. After a few seconds, all the neighbors will be looking out their windows to see who is out there and sure enough the criminal won’t want that. And remember to carry your keys while walking to your car in a parking lot. The alarm can work the same way there. This is something that should really be shared with everyone. Maybe it could save a life or a sexual abuse crime.

I don’t care what your blog theme is, this can save someone’s life and needs to be spread

(via kaisayaka)